LinkedIn

Windows XP and 2003 at Risk

If you are the owner of Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 you are at risk of a pretty significant hack – at least for the time being. 

It’s an attack on the “Windows Help Center”.  The bad news about this attack is that some unwitting, or perhaps witting, genius at Google published how someone can execute the attack without considering the risk he was exposing all XP users to.  The fellow’s name is Tavis Ormondy, a Google security researcher.  Come on Tavis – use some common sense and do the right thing.  As a result of his error in judgement systems in Europe are experiencing a significant peak in hacks.  The U.S. may be next.

So, right now, as of today, if you are using Windows XP or running a Windows Server 2003 for your business you are at risk.  If you visit a web site that is exploiting the security hole your machine could be in big trouble – which is why I’m writing this article – to get the word out.  

The vulnerability exists in the Windows “Help Center”.  Yes – the same one that provides automated updates.  I won’t bore you with the details but you can download a temporary fix that will protect you from attack but it is not a permanent fix.  My understanding is that the download will also disable some help center functionality.  But I recommend you do it as soon as possible.  You can download the fix at http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/MS10-042.mspx.

This is probably a pretty good time to upgrade to Windows 7 if you’ve been thinking about it.  My understanding is that a permanent fix could be as long as 2 months away – due to testing and all of the other stuff involved in a release.

Here is an informative Computer World article on the subject: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9178084/Hackers_exploit_Windows_XP_zero_day_Microsoft_confirms

Back to the Future! Whatever Happened to Made in America?

Back to the Future!

If you are as old as I am (and I don’t consider myself ancient) you’ve lived through some pretty interesting recessions.  You’ve seen home mortgage rates at 17.5%, incredible inflation and economic hard times that were actually worse than what we are seeing right now (with the exception of the insane spending by the government which has reached new heights).  I know that’s no consolation to those of you who have lost their job, but I want to share a stupid idea that worked in the 1980’s during the Reagan Administration and I have no doubt would work again.

Before I get into the details let me ask you a question.  If you walk into WalMart, Target, Sears, Macy’s or any other store and picked up and item off of the shelf, how many would say “Made in America”.  I think the odds are that it would say “Made in China”.

In order to keep this simple I want to use a simple example.  Let’s say we are a tribe of hunters and we have a person who is much better at making bows and arrows than hunting.  So he stops hunting and trades his bows and arrows for wild game from other hunters.  He discovers that he can accumulate more wild game making bows and arrows than hunting.  Based on the labor and materials he can sell his bow and arrow for an equivalent of $10.  He is so successful that he builds a factory and hires people to make bows and arrows and the economy thrives.

One day he discovers that he can buy a bow and arrow from the tribe in China for $5.  It is almost as good as the one his factory makes and he doesn’t have to put up with all of the regulation, unions and taxes.  All he has to do is buy the cheap bows and arrows from China and resell them to his tribe.  So he shuts down his factory and tells all of his people that the tribe is now in the “Information Age” and it isn’t necessary for the tribe to actually produce things any more.  They all need to get retrained for the future.

Things go well for a while and everyone is happy because they are buying bows and arrows cheaper than what it would cost them to make them.  But after a year, the chief of the tribe is upset because he used to get a small percentage of each bow and arrow maker employed in the factory.  Now they don’t have jobs and the tribe revenue has fallen.  But the chief still needs the money and doesn’t want to cut spending.  So he goes to the tribe in China and asks for a loan until the tribe in America gets back on its feet. 

The tribe in China has been so busy making bows and arrows for the American tribe and the rest of the world that they have plenty of money saved up and they are glad to lend the money to their biggest and oldest customer.  After all, the tribe in China made $226.8 billion dollars in 2009 by selling bows and arrows to the American tribe.

The Role of Technology in Education

Technology is transforming the way we learn and teach.  We are already seeing learning being transformed into an “open system” via the Internet. It is readily accessible to the highly educated, the young and those who failed to get an education in their youth. The future of education is no longer the monopoly of brick and mortar schools.

The last great change in the way people were educated occurred with the advent of the printed book by Gutenberg in 1440.  The foundations for our current system of education was established by John Amos Comenius between 1628 and 1632 when he published his work titled “Didactica Magna” which proclaimed that both noble and ignoble children, boys and girls alike, should be sent to school and educated.  He proposed that society would benefit if they were occupied learning “useful things”.

The way that subjects have been taught has not changed much until now. We have known for hundreds of years that we learn behaviorally through drill, repetition and feedback.  And that learning is best done in stages and that those stages are mastered differently, either more or less easily, by different students.  When children of different abilities and interests are grouped by age and force fed subject matter it does not account for those differences.  In this way technology is far superior in providing instruction to the student depending on their own rate of learning.  The activity of the teacher is no longer focused on the repetition, drill and administration, but on the leading, directing and motivating the student.

With technology, students become their own instructors.  We are seeing children become computer literate at a very young age.  They are competent at interfacing with and using computers as a learning tool. Today’s labor intensive schools will become unnecessary in the future.

The challenge for educators, and their top priority, must be a commitment to literacy.  This commitment is crucial to society and to the young student.  Only when a student attains a high level of skill and mastery of a subject do they become self confident, competent and able to contribute to society.

The role of the teacher will change.  While technology is the best tool for providing repetition and practice to the student – it is boring.  Computer programs can be written to lessen the boredom but the real motivation for the student is when they realize achievement.   Achievement is the strongest motivator and one that is recognized by our society.  The athlete who practices speed skating spends hours and hours going in circles on an ice track.  But the one who achieves Olympic fame is honored by a gold medal for their achievement.  This achievement inspires and motivates others to spend hours and years in boring repetition in order to become the best in the world.  The importance of repetition and drill will not be eliminated by computers.

Technology can free the teacher from the repetitive and routine activities.  It can provide the teacher with the results of the student’s efforts so that they can be analyzed in order to identify strengths and weaknesses.  This can be done through test results, video tape or monitoring the learning process.  The role of the teacher will be to recognize and acknowledge achievement and direct the student to mastery of the subject.  The student will then be able to contribute to society.

Technology also provides employers and adults seeking advanced education new opportunities to master subjects without interfering with their daily responsibilities.  The role of educators in advanced subjects will focus not only on directing and leading, but on challenging the student to new levels of achievement by focusing on their strengths.

The new “open system” of learning is essential to our rapidly changing society.  New techniques, tools and systems are constantly being introduced.  This requires that the student learn new things about a subject they had previously mastered.  Technology and the economy are no longer static during the lifetime of the student.  It is changing – sometimes rapidly. 

In 1965 Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, introduced the concept that technology is improving at an exponential rate.  It has held true that “data density” has doubled approximately every 18 months since that time.  This has led to the flat screens, netbooks, highly functional cell phones like the iPhone and now reading devices like the Kindle, Nook and iPad that can store 10,000 books and play video.  This frees the student from studying at a physical location and opens new teaching possibilities.  But, it also means that new subject matter may also be added at a furious pace.  In order to stay at an advanced level of literacy, the student must commit to a life a continual learning.  This can only be effectively done by technology.

Revolutionary automated outbound call system using Skype

Sometimes I love my job as a Software Architect because I get to invent new toys to play with that make life easier, less tedious and, on occasion, provide real value.  Well, I just finished designing one of those toys.  It is a very different kind of automated calling system that uses Skype voice over IP, the latest text to speech technology and seamless web services to do something very cool.

Over the past 10 years research has shown that if schools hold students accountable for their behavior they typically reduce problems like being late to class, using cell phones, etc. by up to 80%.   They also know that the minute they stop holding the students accountable they slip back into the bad behavior almost immediately.  In the late 1990’s our company pioneered parental involvement by being the first to instantly send an email to the parent when a tardy slip or disciplinary action was assigned to a student.  Since then, eCampusUSA.net (one of FTI’s companies) has issued over 3,000,000 tardy slips and almost 2,000,000 disciplinary actions – but there has always been a problem.  What if the parent doesn’t have email or it isn’t in the student record?

The old solution to the problem was either to print a letter and mail it to the parent or make a phone call.  The problem with the letter is that mailing costs continue to rise.  And while we have automated the process of printing so that the school doesn’t have to print labels or address envelopes, it is still labor intensive.  Some schools would have to mail 200 letters a day and at a buck a letter it could cost 180 x $200 = $36,000 per year.   Not exactly the best solution – even if you cut the cost in half.

If a school wants to automate phone calls to parents, installing their own dialer can be very expensive.  Installing an automated dialer to call parents requires a separate computer, installation of a very expensive digital phone card that costs at least $2500 and is difficult to install and configure – to say the least – if you ever tried to configure one you’d know what I mean.  The school also must pay for a monthly charge for all of the dedicated phone lines.   The cost of a dialer for a school can cost $5,000-10,000 a year when you consider phone lines, support and installation.  Then you have the problem of setting up the data so that it can begin making the calls which can be a lot of work – and the reality is that most systems cannot provide the data that can be fed into an automated calling program. For schools on tight budgets, that cost is out of the question.

The new system is amazing.  When a school issues disciplinary action of any kind to a student and the parent email is missing, a customized phone call to the parent is made within minutes.  The greeting and message tells the parent about the offense and when detention or other corrective action will be held.  Every message is unique and in a human voice.  The result of the call is then stored in the student record so that a school administrator can see the result of every phone call. 

The school doesn’t need to install any hardware or software to make this happen.  All they need is a browser and Internet connection.  The rest is done automatically.  Instead of spending thousands of dollars and having to put up with the support headaches it only costs them $39 a month regardless of the number of phone calls.  You might say – really?  But don’t services of this type always charge per call?  You would be right.  Most services charge 4-10 cents per call.  If a school made 200 calls per day it would cost  $160-400 per month.  How can we offer this service for only $39 per month?  You see – I told you that sometimes inventing new toys is fun!

The reason we can do it for that amount is because we use Skype as our phone service.  We have a server that talks directly to the eCampus server in real time to see if any calls have to be made.  If there are calls, then it gets the message that is unique for every call and converts it from digital text to speech using the latest in speech technology.  It sounds more like a human than a robot and I’ve even had people talking to the system thinking a person was on the other end of the line.  Pretty cool stuff!  Then, it dials the parent’s phone number using a special interface we built into Skype.  If the parent picks up the phone it plays the message, if not it leaves a voice mail.  If there is no answer, it tracks that as well.  When the call is finished, it updates the student record with the result.  This takes interaction to a whole new level – and it is incredibly cost effective!

I’ve been thinking about how this technology can be used by doctors and dentists for reminding patients.  Organizations for announcing meetings or reminders.  It is pretty powerful and opens up a whole new means of communication that was previously cost prohibitive.

So I’ve been watching my new toy quietly going about it’s business every day improving the communication between teacher and parent.  Something that would not have been possible 5 years ago.

Microsoft Antivirus may be a Game Changer

Windows 7 was released last week and it looks like Microsoft might be getting its act together.  I wanted to let you know about some free antivirus software that Microsoft has released (not beta) and it is compatible with Windows 7 (unlike some existing antivirus programs).  It looks very good.

It is called Microsoft Security Essentials and can be downloaded at http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/resources.aspx.  It only takes a minute to download and install.  I discovered that it is very comprehensive.  When I rebooted my system it detected an automated backup program that I run and asked if I wanted to give it permission to work through the firewall – so I know it is absolutely checking the firewall.

The second thing is that it was tested against 3,200 viruses and detected all of them, including malware, etc.  You can read the review at http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=4785.

 The third feature that is pretty cool, other than being free, is that it works on Windows XP, Vista and the new 7.  So you can dump all of your old antivirus if you want to.  It is true that it might not have features like a browsing toolbar that your current antivirus has – but – if you load Internet Explorer 8, much of that security is already built in.

From a performance perspective I launched programs as soon as the computer loaded Microsoft Security Essentials.  When I did this with Zone Alarm and McAfee, the system would tend to thrash a bit.  With the MS antivirus this did not appear to be a problem.

So, if you didn’t know about it I hope this was helpful. 

P.S. – If you own stock in McAfee, Norton or others you may want to watch it carefully.  When this is widely publicized it could be a game changer.

Developing Goals Should Not be Mysterious or Difficult

I recently told the story of a hospital administrator who just took charge of a troubled hospital. While examining the types of services they provided to their patients (customers) she noticed that a large number were coming into the ER but were not being admitted – many were children with colds, bumps, bruises, etc. Yet this was creating very long wait times and tying up resources for more serious issues. She set the goal of a nurse meeting every patient within 60 seconds of their arrival and planned to achieve it within 18 months.

It took 12 months for her to achieve the goal of seeing every ER patient within 60 seconds of arrival but the results were astounding. Resources were freed. Waiting lines disappeared. And most unexpectedly all the other operations within the hospital had dramatic improvement because they were now focused on providing rapid services to patients. This one simple goal revolutionized the hospital and it became a model for other hospitals.

I told this story to the a state mortgage operation of a national financial company. I then asked them to make a list of all of their customers, since every business usually has more than one type of customer. They listed the borrower, broker, realtor, appraiser, title company, closing agent, etc. I then asked, “What one thing could you do that would result in your being able to satisfy every one of these customers?” (This is the key question for establishing goals). After some discussion they concluded that if they could process a loan from the time of application to closing in 30 days everyone would be thrilled and would set them apart from the competition.

I asked if they could develop a plan to make that happen? They examined it and concluded it was possible to do it in 30 days – but there were some challenges. I said if the plan says you can do it, then you should be able to make it happen. The plan also revealed the problem areas so that they were able to focus on those processes that would prevent them from reaching the goals.

One of the major benefits of having simple, yet dramatic, goals is that everyone in the organization can understand them and get behind them. It unifies your team. I write about this in my book which you can get a free copy of the eBook version at http://www.ftiglobal.com/fti/contact_us.asp.

P.S. – An important point… notice that the team developed the goal. This is important for buy-in. It wasn’t mandated from the ivory tower.

Time Management

This is a review and “thought map” for Peter Drucker’s chapter on time management from his book “The Essential Drucker – Chapter 16: Know Your Time”.

Drucker makes a distinction between time management for the knowledge worker vs. the manual worker. The performance of a manual worker can be measured in terms of results and is often straight forward – how many parts were made during a hour? Time management for knowledge workers is much more difficult to manage and measure in terms of results. Therefore, the focus of Drucker’s observations deal primarily with the knowledge worker.

His first observation is that effective business executives don’t start with tasks or plans when it comes to managing their time. They start with discovering how their time is spent. At first, this seems counter intuitive, especially for a guy who promoted management by objectives – which is almost nothing but plans and tasks. But there is a method to his madness.

Time has several important characteristics. Unlike raw materials, it is the only resource that is totally limited and slips away if not put to good use. You can never buy more time. It is also the resource that is used by all and every type of work being performed. It is always a factor no matter what type of work is being done or what type of result is achieved.

Drucker makes the interesting observation that we human beings are not equipped to manage time. Research has shown that our memories are inadequate when it comes to remembering how we spent our time. Our minds are almost self-deceiving. If we are asked to write down how we spent the minutes during the past week, even those who think they do a good job of tracking their time, more often than not fail to accurately report on how their time has been spent. If you don’t believe this then get out a sheet of paper and start writing.Drucker’s recommendation is that the only way you will be able to manage time is to Record, Manage and Consolidate time.

The second reason he states as to why humans are lousy at managing time is because we do a terrible job of keeping track of the time. We find it easy to lose track and drift away with some distraction. Then we find ourselves running to catch up. The research to back this up involves people being put into a sterile room with no windows, clocks, furniture or other distractions and they are asked how long they have been in the room. Nearly all of the test subjects dramatically over estimate or under estimate the time. Our time awareness and internal clocks don’t seem to work very well. If we are engaged in something interesting, time seems to fly by. If we are bored and would rather be doing something else, then time seems to stand still.

Recording time is relatively easy but requires discipline. Don’t record what you are doing every 5 minutes! That is not what he is talking about. Record your time whenever an whenever what you are currently doing changes. For example, if you check your email, record the time. If you meet with a customer, record the time. If you have a meeting, record the time (even if it is a casual meeting). Every time the event with which you are involved changes, record the time. At the end of the day and the end of the week you will not have to trust that deceptive mind of yours (which lies to you all of time) about what you did. You will be able to analyze how you spent your time to determine if you are on track, which is the most important benefit.

Managing your time is a little more challenging and involves a bit of analysis. First, you need to look at your recorded time and diagnose how it has been spent. Is there anything you should have eliminated or delegated? You can then make a conscious decision in the future about spending your time involved in those tasks. Keep in mind that the most valuable resource you have is time. This will help you focus.

The second part of diagnosing your time is comparing how you spent your time against your vision of what you want to accomplish. In other words – your goals. This will also determine whether or not you are focused – or if you are scattered all over the place. Obviously, if you are spending your time on tasks that are not related to your goals, then it’s going to be pretty hard to achieve the results that you want. They key idea again is – focus.

Consolidating your time facilitates better management. The concept of consolidation deals with the issues of focus and effectiveness. For example, if you schedule your meetings, reviews and brainstorming sessions one or two days a week, let’s say Monday and Friday, not only do you gain more focus but so does anyone working with you. They know what to expect and when to expect it. It clears your plate of potential distractions. If you deal with major issues every morning, you put boundaries around how your time will spent. You manage your time on purpose, rather than time managing you. Looking for ways to consolidate your time will increase your effectiveness.

Drucker said that the manager’s central task is working with people. By consolidating the time to do that, you are allowing adequate time to work with other people to discuss the issues each of your face. By having adequate time everyone can talk about what they are going to do and why they are going to do it. The results of such conversations are plans, direction and establishment of performance criteria – critical to your goals and vision.

Drucker believed that when you are working with someone that a 15 minute meeting is in adequate. He believed that it takes at least an hour, in a leisurely environment, that allows for the free exchange of ideas. If time is not consolidated – you will never have that hour to spend with someone.

The bottom line is that Drucker believes that a well managed business is quiet – even boring. One of the steps that management can take to achieve the quiet business is by managing their time.

Thought Map: