The Role of Technology in Education

Technology is transforming the way we learn and teach.  We are already seeing learning being transformed into an “open system” via the Internet. It is readily accessible to the highly educated, the young and those who failed to get an education in their youth. The future of education is no longer the monopoly of brick and mortar schools.

The last great change in the way people were educated occurred with the advent of the printed book by Gutenberg in 1440.  The foundations for our current system of education was established by John Amos Comenius between 1628 and 1632 when he published his work titled “Didactica Magna” which proclaimed that both noble and ignoble children, boys and girls alike, should be sent to school and educated.  He proposed that society would benefit if they were occupied learning “useful things”.

The way that subjects have been taught has not changed much until now. We have known for hundreds of years that we learn behaviorally through drill, repetition and feedback.  And that learning is best done in stages and that those stages are mastered differently, either more or less easily, by different students.  When children of different abilities and interests are grouped by age and force fed subject matter it does not account for those differences.  In this way technology is far superior in providing instruction to the student depending on their own rate of learning.  The activity of the teacher is no longer focused on the repetition, drill and administration, but on the leading, directing and motivating the student.

With technology, students become their own instructors.  We are seeing children become computer literate at a very young age.  They are competent at interfacing with and using computers as a learning tool. Today’s labor intensive schools will become unnecessary in the future.

The challenge for educators, and their top priority, must be a commitment to literacy.  This commitment is crucial to society and to the young student.  Only when a student attains a high level of skill and mastery of a subject do they become self confident, competent and able to contribute to society.

The role of the teacher will change.  While technology is the best tool for providing repetition and practice to the student – it is boring.  Computer programs can be written to lessen the boredom but the real motivation for the student is when they realize achievement.   Achievement is the strongest motivator and one that is recognized by our society.  The athlete who practices speed skating spends hours and hours going in circles on an ice track.  But the one who achieves Olympic fame is honored by a gold medal for their achievement.  This achievement inspires and motivates others to spend hours and years in boring repetition in order to become the best in the world.  The importance of repetition and drill will not be eliminated by computers.

Technology can free the teacher from the repetitive and routine activities.  It can provide the teacher with the results of the student’s efforts so that they can be analyzed in order to identify strengths and weaknesses.  This can be done through test results, video tape or monitoring the learning process.  The role of the teacher will be to recognize and acknowledge achievement and direct the student to mastery of the subject.  The student will then be able to contribute to society.

Technology also provides employers and adults seeking advanced education new opportunities to master subjects without interfering with their daily responsibilities.  The role of educators in advanced subjects will focus not only on directing and leading, but on challenging the student to new levels of achievement by focusing on their strengths.

The new “open system” of learning is essential to our rapidly changing society.  New techniques, tools and systems are constantly being introduced.  This requires that the student learn new things about a subject they had previously mastered.  Technology and the economy are no longer static during the lifetime of the student.  It is changing – sometimes rapidly. 

In 1965 Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, introduced the concept that technology is improving at an exponential rate.  It has held true that “data density” has doubled approximately every 18 months since that time.  This has led to the flat screens, netbooks, highly functional cell phones like the iPhone and now reading devices like the Kindle, Nook and iPad that can store 10,000 books and play video.  This frees the student from studying at a physical location and opens new teaching possibilities.  But, it also means that new subject matter may also be added at a furious pace.  In order to stay at an advanced level of literacy, the student must commit to a life a continual learning.  This can only be effectively done by technology.

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